Above It All


Just a place to escape to...
munchkinpunkin roanoakstudios

munchkinpunkin roanoakstudios

Source: thingsonhazelshead

theartofanimation:

Juliette Oberndorfer

theartofanimation:

Juliette Oberndorfer

heavy-flow:

Dear Hearts…

heavy-flow:

Dear Hearts…

Source: heavy-flow

iibrett:

Just got sent this, i’m dying.

Lmao

iibrett:

Just got sent this, i’m dying.

Lmao

Source: byeatsleepshift

dragonyuri1:

now this is what i like to see… if i’m gonna buy some fancy new Strong Product i wanna see it beat the weaker version of itself into total useless garbage…… its called innovation and i’ve never been so happy to be a capitalist…

dragonyuri1:

now this is what i like to see… if i’m gonna buy some fancy new Strong Product i wanna see it beat the weaker version of itself into total useless garbage…… its called innovation and i’ve never been so happy to be a capitalist…

Source: weirdnessisgood

driftk1ngs:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/coreywphoto
Nissan Silvia 240SX

Source: driftk1ngs

superlinguo:

tastefullyoffensive:

Name Improvements for Everyday Stuff [x]

Reblogging because these new names for everyday stuff are bringing some LOLs to our weekend.

The creative names above are reminding us of the awesome power of the compound word - most of the new names offered here are compound words (with a notable exception being the cute portmanteau ‘porksicle’). 

Compound words are great. Why feel restricted by using words on their own? Combine them and feel the power of a new, compounded word! 

We classify a compound word as a word which is composed of more than one free morpheme

In linguistic morphology, we make the distinction between a bound morpheme as a morpheme (the smallest grammatical unit in a language) that appears only as part of a larger word, whereas free or unbound morpheme is one that can stand alone. A compound word brings together previously ‘free’ or separate words, and bam, a new word is created.

Generally, an English compound word consists of a ‘head’ (e.g. moose) and a ‘modifier’ (e.g. sand, denoting what type of moose it is). 

We can get very creative in English with compound words - they can use nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions and adverbs. And they can be hyphenated (e.g. mother-in-law), closed (e.g. football, childlike) or open (e.g. real estate). 

Compound words demonstrate the flexibility and malleability of language - if you can’t find a word that fits, put two (or more) others together and you’re all set. 

Source: tastefullyoffensive

ruaniamh:

kaymonstar:

I keep laughing.

HERE COMES THE AIRPLANE

ruaniamh:

kaymonstar:

I keep laughing.

HERE COMES THE AIRPLANE

Source: quevidamastriste